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CITY OF FERRYSBURG RECREATION FACILITIES

CITY OF FERRYSBURG RECREATION FACILITIES ( See Apppendix for larger scale maps)
, at 80 acres in size, is the City of Ferrysburg 's major community park facility. The land was used for many years as a shooting range by the U.S. Coast Guard, and was acquired by the City for park use in 1973. This Park is about 50% developed and has significant opportunities for additional facilities.

Current facilities at the park include:

One unlighted softball field A soccer field
Barrier-free children's' playground A picnic pavilion
One restroom building (3) sand volleyball courts
(4) basketball courts A paved non-motorized path loop through
the north portion of the park
(2) tennis courts


The overall accessibility rating for this park would be a rating of 4 the entire park for the most part meeting accessibility guidelines.


Ferrysburg Nature Preserve (FNP), This Natural Resources Area is a L-Shaped 43 acre parcel bordered to the east by Dogwood Drive, to the south by Mohawk Drive, to the west by Hiawatha Drive and to the north by the Spring Lake township border. The park consists of 43 acres of undeveloped dune property. The site is a public accessible, green-space preserve. The future land use plan states the future land use should focus on passive and non-invasive recreation so as to minimize land disturbance. The Recreation Committee has recommended this site as the highest priority project for the community to pursue.

The overall accessibility rating for this park would be a rating of 1 for the entire park with none of the facilities/park areas meeting accessibility guidelines. This is due to the lack of any development rather than out-of-date facilities.

William Ferry Park is another City-owned and operated Community Park, located on the Spring Lake waterfront in the City of Ferrysburg, north of the M-104 off-ramp. The facilities at the park, which were upgraded within the last 14 years, include paved parking and paths, barrier-free restrooms, a 400-foot long, barrier-free, waterfront boardwalk, picnic shelter with adjacent beach sand play space and several picnic tables. The park occupies a highly visible location at a major entryway to the City. Its importance also lies in its provision of public access to the waterfront.

The overall accessibility rating for this park would be a rating of 4 the entire park for the most part meeting accessibility guidelines.

Firebarn Park is located adjacent to the firehouse, at the corner of 174th Ave. and North Shore Rd. Less than 5 acres in size, this City-owned neighborhood park facility offers two tennis courts, a basketball court also used for skating, children's playground and one softball field. The park has no potential for additional facilities without acquisition of additional land.

The overall accessibility rating for this park would be a rating of 1 for the entire park with none of the facilities/park areas meeting accessibility guidelines. This is due to out-of-date facilities.

Kitchel-Lindquist Dunes Preserve is a 112-acre natural dune area owned by the City of Ferrysburg, and located just south of the City and east of North Shore Drive within Grand Haven City limits. The property is characterized by primary dunes undergoing active dune formation, secondary dunes covered with mature hardwoods and interdunal areas of rolling sand. A Master Plan has been prepared for the property that outlines measures for long-range protection of the dune environment and minimal improvements to foster low-impact public use. Restrictions in the deeds that conveyed the land to the City require the City to maintain the Preserve in its current natural state as a natural, aesthetic and educational resource. Existing facilities include an entrance identification sign, a small paved parking area, an outdoor classroom structure with restrooms, and two marked trails.

The overall accessibility rating for this park would be a rating of 3 for the entire park most of the facilities/park areas meet accessibility guidelines. This is due to the nature of the park being a dune preserve with wood chip trails.

Non-Motorized Paths, in the form of connector trails and on street bikeways have been completed along several of the major streets in the City, and along the Spring Lake waterfront. A 400-foot long boardwalk is located along the Spring Lake channel, in William Ferry Park and extending south from the Park. Non-motorized paths have been completed adjacent to Pine St. from William Ferry Park, north to West Spring Lake Road, the Ridge Avenue path from Pine Street to 174th Avenue and along West Spring Lake Rd. to the City limits, where the path connects with the Spring Lake Township path system. Asphalt paths have also been completed along 3rd St., from Pine St. west to 174th Ave., and along 174th Ave. from 3rd St. north to Dogwood Dr. Four foot-wide paved bike lanes are in place along North Shore Rd. and North Shore Dr., to the Grand Haven city limits.

The City has completed its entire portion of a continuous trail system encircling Spring Lake. The Tri-Cities Connector Path through the US-31/M-104 interchange and across the US-31 and M-104 bridges, connects Ferrysburg with Grand Haven and Spring Lake Village. Other sections such as the path on Dogwood Drive from 174th Avenue to the city limits connects the City with the exisitng Spring Lake Township path. Non-motorized path planning and construction efforts with other local governments in the region create the potential for development of a coordinated regional trail network.

The overall accessibility rating for the entire trailway system would be a rating of 4 for the system is designed to meet many of the AASHTO standards and for the most part meeting accessibility guidelines.
RESOURCE INVENTORY (Optional)
A resource inventory can be used to identify open space areas that may be desirable for protection and/or public access through acquisition or other means. This resource inventory, utilizing mapping prepared in 2001 as part of the City Master Plan by Langworthy-Strader-LeBlanc and Associates, can assist in identifying the most desirable lands for acquisition in terms of their ecological significance, location, proximity to other natural areas, and other factors. Typically, a resource inventory would be conducted by creating a map of each type of resource or feature considered important for conservation purposes, such as existing land use, future land use, natural features such as wetlands, woodland and critical dune areas, special land use considerations and vacant land availability. These maps can then be combined with each other to determine the relative conservation value of different lands and the relationship of these lands to each other. Land already protected, such as public parks and recreation areas, state or national forests, are also designated as public lands on the existing land use map.